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of grievances that the united states had against great britain in the early 19th century. many are associated with maritime disputes between great britain and the united states because this is the middle of that -- napolian wars. they are trying to establish trade, and they are impressing seamen from american vessels because they need to script crews to keep the royal navy manned because they were disputing with the british and the indians on the frontier, and british policy affected the prizes very badly, and prizes for american exports slumped during this period causing an agricultural depression making people angry. there's a whole range of those sort of grievances. basically, i think why the war was ultimately fought and why it was fought when it was because many of the disputes have been preceded in 1812 by a number of years without necessarily producing the declaration of war was that by the summer of 1811, the main grievance was something called the council, a british form of executive order, the american equivalent is the executive order issued by the president, and through the execut
that has helped expedite this thing with terrorism and their attacks on the united states? is it one person or many? who is responsible? >> i don't think there's a nickel's worth of difference between the two policies in terms of foreign policy. the first president bush, mr. clinton, the sec and mr. bush and mr. obama have made it their business to light to the american people, to insist we are being attacked because of what we think here in north america or how we lived rather than with united states government has done. the core of the problem is intervention in other people's business. part of that intervention is unfortunately necessary. we have to defend the saudis and operate because we depend on oil. our support of israel and our intervention in south sudan, the relentless intervention of the united states on issues that are not very important to it is because of what is going on and it is a bipartisan stimulus. it's not just one person. until we stop that war think about stopping at, there is no chance to stop this war and that is why so much about kite has spread so greatly since 2
, in 1961, the cuban constitution was identical to that of the united states. those words in that constitution did not protect us. words do not protect you. understanding and be leaving in the words do. -- and believing in the words do. we today have a serious problem in that regard. the "new york times" three weeks ago -- "time" magazine three weeks ago reported as a cover story how the constitution is under siege, and "newsweek" about two months ago had a cover story about the failure of americans to understand our government. some very scary statistics. two out of every three graduating high-school students today believe that the three branches of government are republican, democrat, and independent. that is an actual poll. 75% of all americans don't know that religious freedom is protected by the first amendment. 75%. more americans can name the judges on "american idol" than on the supreme court of the united states. what does this mean to us? how did we get here? well, first of all, unless the next generation understands the obligations imposed by the constitution, w
the united states government was drafting the moral act and the homestead act of 1862 if they ever thought about the possibility of counter fit operations being established in the midwest and northern great plains.counterfit operati established in the midwest and northern great plains. and if so what were their plans in preventing such an event. >> i found no record of that being a concern it for tfor they department, which particularly in 1862 was, if you read samson chase's, the secretary treasury's diary, it becomes clear that he was running an endless effort simply to fund the next day's operations. or argue bring the past weably operations. day after day he comes in to his office to find million of dollars of unpaid bills on his desk and he'll complain about the fact that he has no idea how to pay them. and if they had been paid in cou counterfeit money, i think that would have been fine with him. most of the republican party was strongly opposed to the idea of fiat money, greenback money, to begin with. chase and lincoln were really driven to the wall by the fact that they had no alt
book, "crusade 2.0", which is about islamic phobia and its effects in the united states, studied by city life, great press. and instead of reading from the book, i thought it was just a presentation for you and for part. the four parts are going to be a visit, a palm, and e-mail and then finally a political ad. let's start with this. a couple weeks ago i went to new york city have visited park 51, an interesting islamic cultural center. and there he saw the different programs they have available. they teach error back, calligraphy. they have a course on capillary, a brazilian martial art. it was a fascinating, it occurs to me, you might not know what i'm talking about because you might not recognize part 51, the action name part 51 because you might be more familiar with the name that was used in the media to describe park 51, which is of course the ground zero mosque. it was two years ago that this islamic cultural center, not a mosque in knoxville is located at ground zero, but several blocks away became the focus of the great controversy. i don't know if you remember that two
? >> the civil rights section is a unit of the government that was created in 1939 in the united states, just before world war ii. when it was created, it was part of the department of justice, and then it was created, it was thought to be -- it's charge was to protect individual rights, fundamental individual rights. but people were not exactly sure what that meant. with a first thought it meant was labor rights. the rights of workers trying to collectively organize into unions. when world war ii started, race became much more prominent on the national political scene. the civil rights section started to think about how to protect the rights of african-americans. as a result they started to think about how to protect the rights of african-american workers. in the 1940s, it the civil rights takes a whole bunch of cases, and it prosecutes all kinds of employers for violation of civil rights causes. >> was informed by order or legislation? >> it was formed by executive order, franklin roosevelt, and at the request of frank murphy, who was the attorney general. frank murphy was a big labor guy f
weight in the alliance and that europe and nato is heavily subsidized by the united states. if my view, this is a rather simplified and distorted view, not only of the nato budgetary process and how the public good of security shared, funded and measured in an alliance. nonetheless, having said that over the years, there have been many colorful warnings that describe these capabilities gap and the unequal burden sharing, and the number of speeches last year, robert gates probably did more than most to revive this debate, though for me i rather like one of the latest comments which robert kaplan referred to in an article last week. he cited a u.s. air force planner who was clearly exasperated by the shortfalls in key european capabilities during the libya intervention, and he described nato as like snow white and the 27 dwarfs. so the billion dollar question is this, can the smart defense approach a pooling of resources and integration of transatlantic, especially european military procurement to ensure the alliance retains needed capabilities even at a time when the allies are making d
distrust and resentment of the united states can be traced to the mexican war. the mexican war also hastened the civil war. it might not have been fought if the mexican war had not opened the volatile slavery debate. now, the mexican war's often confused with the texan war for independence from mexico ten years earlier in 1836. the texas revolution is known for the battles of the alamo and san ha sin toe -- ha seen toe and the exploits of sam houston and davy crockett. the mexican war is known as polk's war. the 11th president, james k. polk, supervised it from its beginning in may 1846 to the treaty signing 21 months later. the peace treaty transferred 530,000 square miles from mexico to the united states, incredible territory. from mexico we obtained the future states of california, new mexico, arizona, nevada, utah and parts of colorado and wyoming. literally 42% of mexico's territory at that time. the major battles were fought at palo alto, monterey and buena vista, the gates of mexico city. always outnumbered, the americans won every major battle. sometimes, as in buena vista,
, it became law. and the united states shifted to a different system, which has really been a great benefit to our country. there is no question but that the armed forces today, the men and women, every single person is there because they want to be there. they raised their hands and said send me, and god bless them for it. but it was that concept of milton friedman's that he pushed and pushed early on. of course the flip side of that is that i also was involved in something that was quite apart from a conservative tradition. richard nixon went up to camp david back in 1970, i guess, and when he came back down, he had decided to impose wage price controls on america and i remember george schultz came to me and said i want to run the wage price controls for the united states of america. and i said i don't believe in them. and he said i know, don. that's why we want you to do it, because it's such a bad idea. sure enough, they were imposed, and what we did was try to manage them so they didn't distort our economy so we wouldn't release a lot of the smaller companies, we had the larger compani
for the absolute, full, and complete end of slavery. you know, every slave in the united states immediately. and the people who are very active in this movement are often devout protestants, blacks and whites, men and women, people from all parts of the united states. but we must always remember that this is a small number of people. this was never a mainstream movement. this was never a mass movement. and students from our perspective today -- you know, when we look back at this, we would say, well, of course slavery should end. of course slavery should be abolished. you know, all thinking adults today would agree on that. and slavery is illegal everywhere now. the last country to abolish slavery was actually saudi arab arabia, which abolished slavery in 1962. 1962, not 1862. so it's been a long, hard struggle. but slavery is illegal now everywhere. but to say these things in the 1830s and '40s and '50s took a lot of courage. this took a lot of guts. this is not mainstream opinion. this is going against mainstream opinion. these people are at the cutting edge of reform. these people are in
that refused to fight in the united states for example eugene debs rose to give a tour against american participation in the war and was sent to prison and was still in prison in november 1920 when he received nearly a million votes for president on the socialist ticket. another america the pioneer social worker jane addams also was a strong opponent of the war for more than 500 americans were jailed as conscientious objectors including these two at fort riley arkansas. in germany the great radical spoke out against the war and britain the meeting philosopher was most elegant of the war a hero for me writing this book. i will review one thing if you want describing the feeling he rode and i appreciate him because of this intellectual bravery and acknowledging the conflict in his feelings which is something that often most of us don't do when we take a political stand. they describe themselves as being tortured by patriotism as ardently as any retired colonel. love of them was the strongest the motion i possessed and in a period setting aside such a moment making it difficult as truth, t
was passed that there would be millions of pieces of paper circulating across the united states into every home and every pocket and wallet and there ought to be a picture on there. so every denomination and every greenback printed during the civil war had his picture on it. until he left the treasury secretary. any other questions? >> i'm very encouraged by the accomplishments and troubled by the prescription for their success. i was curious if there is anything we could do other than asking the friends to leave the chab for the session for prospect and success. >> hopefully we will not have such an extreme solution, but i think in the second of my points where i talked about a compelling agenda, this is where i see a way forward. this is a 50-50 point in our country right now. the election after election being decided by a handful of votes and the election in 2000 of the loser winning in the popular vote. one of the explanations is that neither of the parties really has a vision for the majority of americans that they find compelling. they work on wedge issues and they turn up the volume
the response would be in the united states you have human rights problem to. that is not a comparable discussion of. >> thank you for having me back. i like to be where the audience is a gauge. i am delighted to speak to an audience who want to be here. [laughter] i am flattered you took your evening to come listen to me. my students are interested but i know if they did not have a test or papers or held accountable most seats would be empty. so i buydown flattering. i could give you a test at the end. i will tell you about arid her and why i wrote a book about him called "the heartbreak of aaron burr." i cannot tell you the whole story without giving away the ending and i don't want to because not just because i want you to buy the book but the reason i wrote the book in the first place. and in particular quality at a question my mother put to me. it goes to the heart of why people write. i t trading to graduate students. those who also completed the come from history and communications, and the english department and the finance. they are apprentice writers
going to be millions and millions of pieces of paper circulating across the united states into every wallet, symbols of prosperity and the future of the country and there ought to be a picture on there. so every denomination, every greenback printed during the civil war had chase's picture on it until he left as treasury secretary. so any other questions? >> one quick question. i'm very encouraged by the 37th congress' accomplishments, but i'm also troubled by the prescription for their success and i was curious if there was anything that we could do other than asking our good friends from south of the mason dixon to kind of leave the session, which governor perry has indicated some desire to do, if there's any other success for relieving gridlock today. >> yes, that's an excellent question. hopefully we will not have such an extreme solution, but i think in the second of my points where i it talked about a compelling agenda this is where i tend to see a way forward. i would argue that part of the fact that we are at such a 50/50 in our country right now, election after election bein
't dream. my mother believed and my father believed that if i wanted to be president of the united states, i could be. i could be vice president. my mother and father and believed that if my brother and sister wanted to be a millionaire, they could be a millionaire. my mother and father dreamed as much as any rich guy dreams. >> absolutely. >> any don't get it! they don't get who we are. >> good morning. it's thursday, may 17th. >> who was that? >> that was the vice president of the united states. >> i don't get it. >> what do you mean you don't get it? >> i don't get who they are. i'm joking. of course, i get who joe is. >> i get who joe is. >> i am joe. joe is me. >> yes, you are. >> all right. >> you're confused. >> i'm back we have. we have jim cramer on the set running into 30 rock this morning scurrying around in circles going where is the "wall street journal." he looked like he needed a fix. >> mike, you hung out with baseball on us last night. >> baseball owners and bob bowman and who we were talking about who created and developed mlb-tv, which is just spectacular. >> spectacula
some of the issues the united states has long pushed. geithner recognizes china has moved towards a more market based exchange rate, but he does know that the yuan has more room to strengthen against the u.s. dollar and other currencies. he says a firmer yuan will give beijing more flexibility when it comes to balancing growth and inflation. take a look at the u.s. dollar versus the yuan, pretty much unchanged. hillary clinton touched on a host of diplomatic issues urging china to play its part when it comes to diffusing global tensions particularly with north korea and iran. clinton addressed prickly human rights issues which have taken center stage following the news surrounding dissident chen guangcheng. >> as part of our dialogue, the united states raises the importance of human rights and fundamental premiefreedoms. because we believe that all governments do have to answer to citizens aspirations for dignity and the rule of law and that no nation can or should deny those rights. >> and our very own emily chan has been following these developments and she's standing by in beij
in the southwest united states, where cities that were, if you take certain cities on the edge of california, on their edge of los angeles, for example, that were -- had a conventional post war democratic and have now become 90 to 95% hispanic, this is a democratic that wasn't even in the 1960 u.s. census. that's actually a big transformation in a fairly short space of time. and it has consequences. now, when you put the why, i would do you care, that's the benign view. people think -- we were talking about broadway just we went on air. that's like the production of holiday pel low doll -- "hello dolly" and then he ran out of brassy, middle-aged blonds, and then he changed it to an all-black cast, and people think that's what happened if you have a muslim netherlands or muslim britain, there will be fewer pubs, the pubs will have to close, but essentially it will basically still be the same, and i don't think that's -- no serious person would argue that. >> host: on the cover of the new paperback version of "america alone" there's a little sticker, soon to be banned in canada. >> guest: that
the noose himself for the sole reason that he was an american citizen. the united states consulate at kingston noticed that an american was among the accused and began putting pressure on the british government to release him. this was achieved on the same day that samuel clark, his associate, is also brought up and executed in a similar manner as gordon. the u.s. consul takes menard, whisks him away to kingston and places him on the next ship bound to new orleans. under u.s. government purchase, they bought him the ticket. menard's wife and young child were left behind in kingston. he didn't even have time to say good-bye to her, which comes up later in his career. he does reunite with the family and they are able to make it out of jamaica and to new orleans. when he leaves jamaica, is brought to new orleans, his stock rises instantly in the british empire as an eyewitness to the events that have just happened. this is an excerpt of a letter that he wrote to john stuart mill, the famous english classical liberal, sometimes member of parliament and intellectual leader of the mid-19
, from all over the united states. not just from states with big slave populations, which is what we might expect, but even in free states. in states where slavery had been abolished during a revolution or soon after the revolution there was still a lot of criticism. and we must remember that the past is different from the present. we must remember that the whole spectrum of political opinion is completely different from what it is today. many of the presidents are themselves slave owners. and the president of the united states in the 1830s was a very wealthy slave owner, andrew jackson. we talked about that in an earlier lecture. and jackson denounced abolitionists. he said they were dangerous, they were incendiaries, they were trying to harm the united states, they were trying to harm american society. so this is something that is a hard fight for abolitionists in this generation. and the 19th century has been called by historians the century of emancipation because this fight takes place in many different societies. and it's a hard fight everywhere. and everywhere slave owners fig
of enfranchising women, the united states is in the middle of the pack, you know, behind new zealand, 1893, the first western style democracy to enfranchise women, behind australia, behind great britain, ahead of portugal, 1976, ahead of kuwait, 2006. so the u.s. is sort of in the middle of the pack. and if elizabeth cady stanton had then told in 1888 that the female suffrage was something that was going to happen decades into the future i think she would have been disbelieving. she had a lot of confidence as did many other reformers that this was the right thing to do. it's interesting, however, that stanton doesn't mention the fact that women had already voted in a part of the united states. we talked about that in an earlier lecture. does any one remember where they used to vote? yeah, new jersey. they voted in new jersey for about a generation from the 1770s to the early 1800s then were disenfranchised, i think i mentioned this. they were disenfranchised because a member of the new jersey state legislature had lost a race earlier and he blamed it on women voters for some reason. it was
in the course of this presidential campaign? >> well, i think in many ways what the role of the united states is, how do we operate internationally and how much is the world dependent on us, how do our national interests play into that? and obviously dealing with the terrorist threat is very important, nuclear proliferation, how to make sure that the worst weapons don't get into the hands of the worst people. our economic security obviously plays into that because our strength depends on our strength at home. it's the integration of all of these issues and then basically what you are responsibilities are towards our allies and to those that in many ways are suffering as a result of their desire for freedom. >> and look what we have just this weekend with a g-8 meeting and nato at a time when the euro zone is under tremendous economic strain which could have an impact on our own economy here, the whole issue of economic austerity becoming an issue for our debt problems here in the u.s. so we feel such interrelationship and all the while winding down the conflict in afghanistan and what responsibi
with a confederate flag right behind him. literally a flag of treason. running for president of the united states, i couldn't even -- my eyes went like this. i couldn't even -- even knowing who ron paul is, i think it pretty much was him, literally, actually him. he went on tim russet -- this must have been '08 it would have been -- he went on "meet the press" and made the argument that lincoln being a tyrant, it would have ended, anyway. i don't know if anyone has aggressively made that argument. is ron paul even a southerner? he is a southerner. but is he from texas? >> he is from texas. >> he's originally from texas, okay. >> all right. so he's a southerner. there you go. his appeal is certainly much broader than that. it really, really is. i would say if george allen wins the senate race, george allen is another person who is very much identified -- >> that's in virginia. >> -- in virginia. i think he is a southerner. i think he actually grew up somewhere. i think he grew up in california or somewhere. >> his dad was coaching. >> his dad was a football coach moving around. >> right, right, right
and concluded after extensive public notice and comment by adopting the guidelines that the united states access board developed in 2004 during the george bush administration. certain members of the hotel industry have claimed that the regulations require all owners to require fixed lifts and this is costly and burdensome and owners who can't afford it will have to shut down their pools or face penalties. these claims are false. as required by congress, the justice department has increased access to newly existing pools, rules that have been under development for almost 15 years. new pools must be built with either a sloped entry into the pool or a pool lift under these new rules. for existing pools, owners will have to do what is readily achievable based on the size and resource of the owner's business. if it is readily achievable which is defined as easily accomplished to be carried out, a business should take the same steps to improve an existing pool. this means that if a fixed lift can be installed easily and inexpensively, it should be. if installing a fixed lift is too expensive or diffic
situation. i think on balance our european friends and allies believe the united states a is at at table and working hard, trying to deal with increasing problems on the financial side of things, we're trying to work together to get economies balanced and get people back to work in a very big world where the europeans are the number one trading partners. we are intertwined, but domestically here at home, recovering politician, people better start paying attention because this is a democracy that is not a sideline game. it is a representative democracy which means people have to suit up, sit up, and vote, and we're losing that battle, and wiewr losing that battle, unfortunately, i think, because if there's more cynicism because it appears to be chic, then there is really an imperative for people to show up, but part of it is, you know, the sense of partisanship so i think if we can get to where heather wants to be, which is bipartisan national security and foreign policy, that would be great. my vote is for non partisan, getting ourselves to a place -- because we agree so very, very often
says we the united states take nothing less than full responsibility for all of the rebellions that are taking place in europe. he goes on, in this kind of pride in instigating rebellion. then ends his message to the austrian hungarian minister in washington, he says, besides compared to the great extend of the united states, the austrian hungarian empire is but a patch on the earth's surface. this kind of spread eagle bombast was very typical of american diplomatic language. we were just considered by many people, of being a really wild, scary kind of country. a dangerous country in the 19th century. >> and webster was a good diplomat, when he wasn't holding forth. >> that's right. he's a conservative man. he's a good wiig. but there's the kind of attitude we had. we were really bumpshouse. i mean, president grant. the french finally overthrow napoleon iii and the president grant sends a message to the new french government, congratulating them on adopting american principles. what would the french foreign office think of that? we don't know. as if they had no republican tradi
of the first amendment in the united states and public policy relating to the press. so that's where -- that's sort of my lode stone as i think about this. i've also been connected to the press in a variety of ways, including my father owning, running a small newspaper. and i sit on the board of the washingt washingtonpost companies. i've watched the evolution of the press from about one where there was a monopoly or at best an oligolopoly. and i think to the credit of journalists and press institutions, those very favorable and privileged positions in the country were ulgts it'sed to deepen the quality of journalism. so many of the great journalistic institutions we have in the united states -- "washington post," "new york times," so on -- really developed their expert deals in areas of law and science and medicine and economics in the 1970s and '80s as monopoly profits, as it were, made it possible to do that. of course, the internet has undermined that profitability. and one of the consequences of this, a very sad consequence, is the decline in foreign coverage, foreign news. the closing
nearly a year and a half of slaughter, it's far past time for the united states to begin to lead. the united states should work with partners to organize and arm syrian opposition groups to defend themselves. the bloodshed makes clear our goal must be a new syrian government that contributes to peace in the middle east and represents the brave syrian people. we can stop there for a moment. you know what -- >> the chairman of the joint chiefs was on cnn yesterday as well. i think this is the president, not because of what john mccain is saying or what mitt romney is saying but because he knows, i believe, it is time to let assad know that time for talking is over. military action may be around the corner. this is what the chairman of the joint chief said on sunday. >> my job is to provide the chief with options. i think the military option should be considered. i think -- but, my preference, of course, always, as a senior military leader would be the international community could find ways of increasing the pressure on asaid to do the right thing and step aside. >> you have the ch
in the united states. the long-lost 1607 fort was rediscovered in 1994 by william kelso director of the archaeology project. we'll meet senior curator bly straw who explains life in the colony while showing us some of the 1.5 million artifacts collected at the site. join us saturday may 12th beginning at 1:30 p.m. eastern. >>> each week "american history tv's" "american artifacts" takes viewers behind the scenes at archives, museums, and historic sites. in 1215, a group of noblemen confronted the king of england demanding that their rights be recognized, written down and confirmed by royal seal. king john agreed, binding himself and his heirs to the magna carta or the great charter, granting fundamental legal rights to the noblemen, including trial by jury, habeas corpus and no taxation without representation. the 1297 version is still a law on the books in england and wales and that version was the first to apply these rights to all english free men. the charter was later cited in the writings of some of the founding fathers as they sought the same political writes leading up to
a majority in the united states. whites accounted for 49.6% of all births, while minorities, including hispanics, blacks and asians, reached 50.4%. >>> hey, here's some good news for all of us. a new study finds that men who drank at least six cups of coffee a day had a 10% lower chance of death, and for women, the risk of dying was 15% lower. see? it's not so rough getting up this early. >>> and for the first time in 18 years, in the western part of the united states, you can catch a rare type of solar eclipse this sunday. a ring of fire will radiate from behind the moon as it passes in front of the sun. the ring will be bright, so you're going to need to use solar-safe telescopes or projection methods to watch it. >>> well, arizona republican congressman trent franks is holding a hearing today on a bill he's proposed that would ban abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy in washington, d.c. well, last night on "the rachel maddow show," eleanor holmes norton, the district of columbia's only elected delegate to congress, told rachel she's being denied an opportunity to testify on behalf
and, as i said, even the president of the united states. she served as an intern at exceptional parent magazine, living in boston. that summer between her junior and senior year of high school, katie learned to manage her own medical care, directing the nurse who is provided her treatments and managed her ventilator. katie considered advocacy to be her vocation and chosen path. in particular, helping to raise the consciousness of other young people about disability issues. even though she found this work rewarding, she sometimes felt uncomfortable in those pre-a.d.a. days, as we say, pre-americans with disabilities act, to be singled out because of her disability. all she wanted with was, as shet it, to fit in and be normal. her first job was at a music store at a local job. she got the job by virtue of her knowledge and interest in music. but as katie said -- quote -- "advocacy is in my blood and my soul." so she looked for work that would allow her to help other people. she had been volunteering at the local ywca in the secondhand shop that supported the only homeless shelter for wom
: thomas moran embarked on his first trip to the west in 1871. the united states at the time was still recovering from the ravages of the civil war. americans turned with hope to the western frontier. by painting the pristine grandeur of these remote places, moran enabled 19th-century americans to visualize a magnificent landscape most would never see. his paintings transformed their perceptions of the west. from 1867 to 1879, the united states government sponsored four western expeditions, now known as "the great surveys." of all the ais who accompanied them, none is more associated with the surveys than thomas moran. the watercolors he brought back from wyoming, the first color images of yellowstone, played a key role in the creation of the national parks system. yellowstone had long been familiar to american indians, mountainmen, traders and travelers. legendary, seemingly unbelievable stories made their way east. the canyon was said to be a "fearful chasm," the river a "frightful torrent," the sulfur springs wre "diabolical," the place where "hell bubbled up." while the eruption of
. >>> with tensions rising over north korea's activities, the united states and south korea are working together to keep their militaries ready. air force personnel from the two countries are staging their largest ever joint drill on the korean peninsula. about 50 fighter jet bess longing to both countries are taking part in exercises nicknamed max thunder. the drills began on may the 7th and continue through friday. the allies' air forces holds regular drills twice a year to prepare for the possible aift confrontation with north korea or attacks on the south's military bases. during one exercise, f-15 and f-16 jet fighters took off from south korea's air base. the pilots performed role play exercises taking the parts of ally or enemy. guided bombs were displayed at the air base. the weapons can be loaded on fighter jets to attack enemy aircraft or ships. >> and when we train together, we know that there's no force that can beat us. >> translator: any power that threatens peace on the korean peninsula will be thoroughly defeated. >>> the japanese economy posted an increase for a third straight q
the tallest dome built in the united states. it's now stands 307 feet 6 inches from the ground 40 feet taller than the united states capital. >> you could spend days going around the building and finding something new. the embellishment, the carvings, it represents commerce, navigation, all of the things that san francisco is famous for. >> the wood you see in the board of supervisor's chambers is oak and all hand carved on site. interesting thing about the oak is there isn't anymore in the entire world. the floors in china was cleard and never replanted. if you look up at the seceiling you would believe that's hand kof carved out of wood and it is a cast plaster sealing and the only spanish design in an arts building. there are no records about how many people worked on this building. the workman who worked on this building did not all speak the same language. and what happened was the person working next to the other person respected a skill a skill that was so wonderful that we have this masterpiece to show the world today. >> kids with special needs have access to a venture on may 5. ov
in america and around the world. welcome to newsday. reports from the united states say the man at the heart of the latest underwear bomb plot, which the u.s. and its allies say they foiled, was a double agent. u.s. officials are quoted as saying the attacker was working for the cia and saudi intelligence when he was given the bomb. he then passed the device to the americans. the washington correspondents give us more details. >> the would-be bomber, according to reports in u.s. media citing american officials, was a double agent. the way this is described is that the saudi intelligence agency recruited this man, sent him to yemen with the task of convincing al qaeda in the arabian peninsula that he was prepared to blow up himself and a u.s.-bound aircraft. he won the terror cell's trust, and they gave him this device to take with him to blow up a plane. but instead he took the underwear bomb, which is what the officials say it was, to a third country. then it passes immediately into the hands of the cia. >> officials are describing this as a custom-fit device, more complicated and sophistic
-- and the regulations by the united states. so, senator, i do believe is is pretty clear. i think anybody in our organization -- it is a common- sense thing, to me. and a moral thing to me that people understand with the expectation is. >> i thank you for that answer. i think -- i hope you'll take a fresh look to make sure you are drilling all of these values that are important to the secret service. that you have updated since cartagena. so, that the next time a secret service agents decides to think about doing something like they did, a light will go off in their heads and they will conclude the risk is too high. probably in the short run, the memory and the dishonor brought on the agency will be so fresh that hopefully this won't happen. but human nature being what it is over a period of time, we need to have rules and procedures and drilling those rules into personnel that goes on for a much longer period of time to re -- to re -- to a time that meant the as fresh. >> initially, it you did not have information about these women. initially, you did not know whether there were prostitutes, fo
&t network -- doing more with data to help business do more for customers. ♪ >>> why the united states, sisco could weigh on the tech sector. the company issuing a grim outlook saying customers are being cautious on i.t. spending. >> spain taking a stake in the fourth biggest lender. >> surprisingly weak trade pigs call china's growth recovery into question. fouling imports in april hint at waning domestic ghant. >> welcome to "worldwide exchange." let's take a look at u.s. futures. see how we're lookinged a trade. we were looking at a higher hope and we have reverse direction at this point. the dow looking lower by 17, nasdaq by 5 and the s&p 500 slightly over the plot line. this after stocks ended lower again on eurozone fears yesterday, but we did pair steep early morning losses. we also saw volume picking up a little yesterday. dow lost 97 after being down as much as 183 during the morning session. falling for the sixth straight day that we've seen it for the first time since august. also the yield nearing 1.8%, a three month low for that yield right now. >> we tried to rally off the four
the domestic and international commerce of the united states. we would not be promoting privacy legislation if it did not promote the foreign and domestic commerce of the united states. i think the fact we are sitting here alongside chairman leibowitz, who's proposed also advocating for legislation reflects the convergence of economic in this area. important to consumers. it's important to business. it's important to global commerce. >> thank you. commissioner do you have any thoughts on those two? >> well, i do believe, you know, the international element of privacy regulation is very important, but i have to admit, it's something i need to educate myself on a little further before i could offer anything very useful at this point. >> thank you. thank you, chairman rockefeller. really appreciate it. >> thank you. the honorable tom udall, state of new mexico. i'd just like to close with a couple. you know, we talk about the digital advertising alliance is making it very clear they want to cooperate, and they appear to be doing so, but there are two areas where they still can collect informat
pennsylvania, thaddeus stevens, he's an abolitionist. in the 1850s the united states senator from massachusetts, charles sumner, although there are still abolitionists who say this is a mistake, the abolitionists are focused on the goal of ending slavery, but they do have some rather spirited internal debates about how to do that. they also debate the role of women. and believe it or not, some abolitionist men said that female abolitionists were hurting the cause, that they were distracting people from the important issue, that they were discrediting the movement. frederick douglass and william lloyd garrison said no, they're n not. they advocated the right of women to participate in the movement. so let's talk more about some of the female abolitionists, shall we? these are very interesting people who have been the subject of some really excellent biographies. the grinke sisters of south carolina. and grimke is a french name. their ancestors were french protestants who came to south carolina in the colonial period. the family by the early 19th century was very wealthy. they had a beautiful hou
it's very important that the president of the united states, i'm sure we'd share your views on this, speak out from the purge of the white house. obviously, as the leader of the free world. it's amazing to me that when asked about chen guangcheng come he said he had no comment. at the time during the horrible days of apartheid, when lech walesa and nelson mandela and lech walesa, others, if any president, reagan, bush were to be asked about those tremendous individuals, they would launch into a defense of those brave men and women, and yet no comment from the president here. thoughts on that if you could. the concern that we all have about the hurry up offense, time as you said quoting i think mick jagger, is on our side. we could have worked this painstakingly before allowing chen, whom we first heard from, to leave the embassy. and, finally, let me just say when waging change was in moscow, another great political leader, father of the movement in china, i met with him in the early 90s when the chinese wanted olympics 2000, and he was such a high value political prisoner, they tho
bio info in your packets. but he was appoint today the united states court of appeals by george w. bush in 2005, he has a ba from brigham young university, and his jd is from the university of virginia school of law. but most notably, he and his wife are the proud participants of six -- parents of six children and the grandparents of four. we're also particularly thankful to have judge griffith out here since he was at standford only two weeks ago -- stanford only two weeks ago. i don't know if it was us or the weather, but we're glad something could entice him to cock back a second time. >> -- come back a second time. >> thank you again. thanks to michael, e lan and barbara. although, elan, i wish you hadn't remarked i was out here two weeks ago in many light of mr. gray's comment, last panel that the dc circuit is woefully underworked. [laughter] so good morning. for those of us who are familiar with gatherings of the federalist society, this is the obligatory panel on the part of the constitution that seems to be of the greatest interest to federalist society event organizers e
angered many in pakistan. and danielle nottingham reports that some people here in the united states accuse the president of using bin laden's death to gain points with voters. >> reporter: pakistan has not answer some key questions one year after osama bin laden was killed at this compound. pakistani leaders ordered an investigation into whether the terror leader had a support network inside the country. but pakistan is not disclosing its findings and the u.s. says it's disappointed. president obama makes no apologies for killing the al qaeda leader who ordered the 9/11 attacks. >> i said that i would go after bin laden if we had a clear shot at him. and i did. >> reporter: on this first anniversary, the president and his republican rival are trading swipes on the bin laden raid. the president has hinted that mitt romney might not have taken down the terror mastermind. >> i just recommend that everybody take a look at people's previous statements in terms of whether they thought it was appropriate to go into pakistan and take out bin laden. i assume that people meant what they said
intelligence work. >> another good news story because it means the united states working with international partners and what that probably means is intelligence services in the regoj were able to identify this plot well in advance of execution and get control of this device before it ever became a threat to an airplane. the administration's pretty clear though that this plot was not tied to the anniversary of bin lat din's death though they have said they believe that the individual wanted to conduct the attack in this month, in the may time frame. you raise an interesting question though. what does it mean for al qaeda's strength. this is another example of why this affiliate in yemen is such a concern for the u.s., because even though al qaeda central has suffered tremendous losses, aqap as it's known continues to try to do these type of attacks. you mentioned the 2009 attack, the underwear bomber, and then the cargo attempt in 2010, this is another example. this is three in the past four years. this remains an ongoing concern for us. >> the reverend al sharpton is on politics nation. >>
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